Choosing Kitchen Countertops(page 1 of 2)

Granite or laminate? Get tips on how to find the right surface for your remodel.

Original-brian-patrick-flynn-grey-kitchen-countertop_s4x3 Designer Brian Patrick Flynn uses ready-made, dark charcoal wood-look laminate countertops in his midcentury kitchen remodel.

Countertops set the tone for the kitchen, so choose materials and a look that not only reflect your style, but also are in line with how you use the kitchen.

Granite is on the must-have list for many homebuyers. But engineered stone products made primarily of quartz are replacing granite in high-end design today, and their functionality as a stain-resistant, durable, sleek-looking surface fulfills lifestyle and aesthetic prerequisites for many.

Burgin says half his clients go with granite, and half go with a quartz surface. Jorge Castillo, whose clients want modern kitchens, chooses quartz for its consistency. He would rather the focus be on a dramatic statuary marble backsplash than the work surface. “One of the reasons I like CaesarStone and Cambria is because it doesn’t make the kitchen busy,” he says.

Meanwhile, concrete has come a long way. With more colors and a sleek finish, today’s concrete surfaces are more durable. Crushed glass surfaces provide an opulent focal point.


See 13 Gorgeous Kitchen Countertops

Countertop Materials

Here’s a wrap-up of workspace surfaces and how they stand up in the kitchen environment. Keep in mind, countertops may dictate the kitchen design and are sometimes chosen before cabinetry.

Granite. Riding a wave of popularity for the last several years as the surface for countertops, granite is available in several grades, generally 1 through 5 (ratings depend on where you buy it), patterns, colors and thicknesses. Depending on what you choose, a slab can cost you anywhere from $25 per square foot for modular pieces of very basic stone purchased at a home center to upwards of $1,000 per square foot. Thickness can really drive up the cost. If you want granite on a budget, you might consider a three-quarter inch thick slab rather than an inch and a half slab, where you’re more likely to get your money back at resale.


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